Pupil Premium

 

The pupil premium grant is funding to improve educational outcomes for disadvantaged pupils in state-funded schools in England.

Pupil eligibility

The following groups are eligible for pupil premium:

  • pupils who are recorded as eligible for free school meals, or have been recorded as eligible in the past 6 years, including eligible children of families who have no recourse to public funds (NRPF)
  • children looked after by local authorities, referred to as looked-after children
  • children previously looked after by a local authority or other state care, referred to as previously looked-after children
Funding 2023-24
Pupils who are eligible for free school meals, or have been eligible in the past 6 years £1,455    
Pupils previously looked after by a local authority or other state care £2,530    
Children who are looked after by the local authority £2,530

Service pupil premium

Service pupil premium is additional funding for schools with pupils who have parents serving in the armed forces. It has been combined into pupil premium payments to make it easier for schools to manage their spending.

Pupils in state-funded schools in England attract the service pupil premium grant, at the rate of £335 per eligible pupil in financial year 2023-24, if they meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • one of their parents is serving in the regular armed forces, including pupils with a parent who is on full commitment as part of the full-time reserve service – this includes pupils with a parent who is in the armed forces of another nation and is stationed in England
  • registered as a ‘service child’ on any school census in the past 6 years
  • one of their parents died while serving in the armed forces and the pupil receives a pension under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme or the War Pensions Scheme

This funding is primarily to enable schools to offer pastoral support and help mitigate the negative impact of family mobility or parental deployment. It can also be used to help improve the academic progress of eligible pupils if the school deems this to be a priority.

Pupil premium strategy statement 2023-24

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2022 to 2023 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

Windy Nook Primary

Number of pupils in school

291

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

32% (not including nursery)

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021-2022

2023 – 2024

Date this statement was published

October 2023

Date on which it will be reviewed

September 2024

Statement authorised by

Mrs. Lucie Forrest

Pupil premium lead

Mr. Kevin Hawdon

Governor / Trustee lead

Mrs. Julie Wiper

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£133,300

 

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£3,432

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£137,732

 

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

Overcoming barriers to learning is at the heart of our Pupil Premium Grant use. We understand that needs and costs will differ depending on the barriers to learning being addressed. As such, we do not automatically allocate personal budgets per student in receipt of the Pupil Premium Grant. Instead, we identify the barrier to be addressed and the interventions required, whether in small groups, large groups, the whole school or as individuals, and allocate a budget accordingly.

Our ultimate aim is to accelerate progress, moving pupils to at least age related expectations. We aim to provide all pupils with the opportunity to achieve their potential, including those who are already high attainers. Non disadvantaged pupils’ attainment will be sustained and improved alongside progress for their disadvantaged peers.

Alongside academic support, we will ensure that those pupils who have social, emotional and mental health needs will access high quality provision from appropriately trained adults.

Our Priorities for 2023-24

·         Attendance – reducing gap between PP and non PP. Reducing PA rates of PP pupils

·         Phonics – closing the gap between PP and non PP for phonics and reading across school

·         Maths – closing the gap between PP and non PP for maths across school

·         Supporting well-being of PP pupils and support for parents in accessing relevant support services

·         Smaller classes in KS1

·         EAL support – language acquisition

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Assessments, observations, and discussions with pupils indicate

under developed oral language skills and vocabulary gaps among many disadvantaged pupils on entry into the EYFS.

2

Our attendance data over the past 3 years indicates that attendance among disadvantaged pupils has been between 2 – 6% lower than for non-disadvantaged pupils. However, this was partly due to COVID as the difference has reduced over the past 2 years.

Our PA data for the past 3 years indicates that rates of PA have increased for both PP and Non PP pupils; the biggest increase being in Non PP pupils. Our assessments and observations indicate that absenteeism is negatively impacting our disadvantaged pupils’ progress.

3

Support for families to access school trips, after school activities etc to ensure all children received equality of access.

4

Internal and external (where available) assessments indicate that maths and English attainment among disadvantaged pupils is, for some cohorts, significantly below that of non-disadvantaged pupils. (Year 4 and Year 2 writing)

 

5

Lack of engagement with the homework and learning beyond the school day

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Children in the early years to catch up with their peers in relation to attainment in Communication and Language.

By the end of the EYFS, more PP children will reach age appropriate levels in Communication and Language.

The gap in attendance between PP pupils and non PP pupils will have reduced.

Less PP pupils will be on the persistent absenteeism list

More PP pupils will reach the national expected level for attendance

All children will have the same opportunity to experience a wide range of extra-curricular activities

PP children will attend after school and before school activities

A wider range of trips will be offered to all pupils

All children will receive high quality teaching and learning through quality first teach and targeted interventions

Lessen the GAP in attainment between PP and non PP pupils across maths and English

All children to have support and the opportunity to complete extra-curricular work (including academic interventions) .

PP children to be supported within school. Access to homework club including use of chrome books to support this and in the event of home learning.

 

 

Activity in this academic year

 

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £95,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Smaller Classes in EYFS, KS1

EEF Toolkit-  International research evidence suggests that reducing class size can have positive impacts on pupil outcomes when implemented with socioeconomically disadvantaged pupil populations. Some studies also have also found that smaller class sizes in primary schools can have a greater positive impact on disadvantaged pupils than their peers.

4

All staff to be trained in the principles of Rosenshine’s theory and implement them in their practice

Rosenshine’s principle emphasizes the importance of giving students sufficient time to practise retrieval, ask questions, and get the desired help.

Cognitive Psychology Research reveals that the instructors who utilised the most effective teaching strategies had more students with higher educational success rates

4

RWInc ongoing support for all staff to update knowledge and understanding of phonics

Read Write Inc (RWInc) is a DfE validated Systematic Synthetic Phonics programme

Phonics approaches have a strong evidence base that indicates a positive impact on the accuracy of word reading (though not necessarily comprehension), particularly for disadvantaged pupils:

Phonics | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

EEF trials have shown how, when properly

trained and supported, teaching assistants

working in structured ways with small groups

can boost pupils’ progress.

4

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £27,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

EYFS staff deliver Talk Boost and Nelli

 

Staff in KS1 and KS2 will focus on vocabulary development across all subjects

 

Staff in KS1 and KS2 will focus on speaking and listening skills and vocabulary development for EAL pupils

There is a strong evidence base that suggests oral language interventions, including dialogic activities such as high-quality classroom discussion, are inexpensive to implement with high impacts on reading:

Oral language interventions | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

EEF 2020 Children receiving the NELI programme made the equivalent of +3 additional months progress in oral language skills and additional progress in early word reading

EEF Toolkit – Small group tuition has an average impact of four months’ additional progress over the course of a year.

EEF trials have shown how, when properly

trained and supported, teaching assistants

working in structured ways with small groups

can boost pupils’ progress.

1

Reading and phonics  interventions across school targeted at PP pupils

 

EEF Toolkit – On average, oral language approaches have a high impact on pupil outcomes of 6 months’ additional progress. These have a positive impact on reading progress.

EEF Toolkit – Small group tuition has an average impact of four months’ additional progress over the course of a year.

EEF Toolkit  – Reading comprehension strategies are high impact on average (+6 months). Alongside phonics it is a crucial component of early reading instruction.

Read Write Inc (RWInc) is a DfE validated Systematic Synthetic Phonics programme

Phonics approaches have a strong evidence base that indicates a positive impact on the accuracy of word reading (though not necessarily comprehension), particularly for disadvantaged pupils:

Phonics | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

4, 5

Maths interventions delivered across school

 

Mastery in Number training for EYFS and KS1 staff

EEF Toolkit – Small group tuition has an average impact of four months’ additional progress over the course of a year. Small group tuition is most likely to be effective if it is targeted at pupils’ specific needs. Diagnostic assessment can be used to assess the best way to target support.

4, 5

 

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £15,732

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Attendance –  Sharing a part-time home school liaison officer with a local school to support families with attendance and acute needs via TAF and CAF

DfE report on attendance (Working together to improve School attendance May 2022)  and attainment showed strong link between attendance and attainment. Pupils with 100% attendance 4.7 times more likely to achieve than those with 85%.

2

Employ an apprentice Sports Coach to provide after school and lunchtime sports clubs so that all pupils can attend.

Feedback from school pupil questionnaires in 2021 and 2022 indicated that some pupils could not attend after school clubs because of distance from school / no access to a car.

EEF Toolkit – The average impact of the engaging in physical activity interventions and approaches is about an additional one month’s progress over the course of a year. Participating in sports and physical activity is likely to have wider health and social benefits.

3

Support accessing trips, after school activities etc to ensure all pupils receive equal access

Ofsted 2013 report  – The full range of educational experiences – support is given to ensure that all pupils have full access to broad educational experiences, such as residential courses, competing in sporting events, subsidised music lessons, subsidised uniform,

Due to financial pressures,  some of our pupils have had limited experiences outside the home. Evidence shows that these are vital areas of expenditure for children as it raises aspirations, improves cultural capital, improves children’s knowledge of the wider world and has a significant impact on pupils’ academic understanding. 

3

Contingency fund for acute issues.

Based on our experiences and those of similar schools to ours, we have identified a need to set a small amount of funding aside to respond quickly to needs that have not yet been identified.

All

 

Total budgeted cost: £ [insert sum of 3 amounts stated above] £137,732

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2022 to 2023 academic year.

Analysis of assessment data for the end of the academic year 2023, shows that by the end of EYFS 89 % of PP pupils achieved ARE in Communication and Language and 89 % in PSED ,68% of PP pupils passed the Y1 Phonics screen , 57% of PP pupils achieved ARE in reading and 71% IN maths at the end of KS1 and 36% in writing . 62% of PP pupils achieved ARE in reading and 54% maths at the end of KS2 and 46 % in writing. Although gaps still remain between the attainment of PP pupils and other pupils  due to the targeted interventions and quality first teaching these gaps are beginning to reduce in certain cohorts. We will continue with many aspects of our strategy this academic year.

Although our overall school attendance (94.25%) in 2022-23 was lower than in the pre pandemic years, it was higher than the national average and higher than school attendance in 2021-22. Absence among disadvantaged pupils was 2% higher than their peers and persistent absence 7% higher. These gaps have reduced from last year however attendance continues to be a focus of our current plan.    

Our assessments and observations indicated that pupil behaviour, wellbeing and mental health were significantly impacted last year, primarily due to COVID-19-related issues. The impact was particularly acute for disadvantaged pupils. We used pupil premium funding to provide wellbeing support for all pupils, and targeted interventions where required. We also provided extra opportunities to develop well being and resilience through our increased sporting offer.

Due to the impact of our PP offer we will continue with the strategies used in 2022-23 to support our pupils through 23-24.

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme

Provider

Reading Plus

Reading Solutions

NELLI

Elklan

Conquer Maths

Conquer Maths

Times Table Rockstars

Maths Circle

 

Pupil premium strategy statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

Windy Nook Primary

Number of pupils in school

315

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

25%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021-2022

2023 – 2024

Date this statement was published

October 2022

Date on which it will be reviewed

July 2023

Statement authorised by

Mrs. Lucie Forrest

Pupil premium lead

Mr. Kevin Hawdon

Governor / Trustee lead

Mrs. Julie Wiper

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£103,715

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£4,217 +£3,273 = £7490

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£111,205

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

Overcoming barriers to learning is at the heart of our Pupil Premium Grant use. We understand that needs and costs will differ depending on the barriers to learning being addressed. As such, we do not automatically allocate personal budgets per student in receipt of the Pupil Premium Grant. Instead, we identify the barrier to be addressed and the interventions required, whether in small groups, large groups, the whole school or as individuals, and allocate a budget accordingly.

Our ultimate aim is to accelerate progress, moving pupils to at least age related expectations. We aim to provide all pupils with the opportunity to achieve their potential, including those who are already high attainers. Non disadvantaged pupils’ attainment will be sustained and improved alongside progress for their disadvantaged peers.

Alongside academic support, we will ensure that those pupils who have social, emotional and mental health needs will access high quality provision from appropriately trained adults.

Our Priorities for 2022-23

·         Attendance – reducing gap between PP and non PP. Reducing PA rates of PP pupils

·         Phonics – closing the gap between PP and non PP for phonics and reading across school

·         Maths – closing the gap between PP and non PP for maths across school

·         Supporting well-being of PP pupils and support for parents in accessing relevant support services

·         Smaller classes

·         EAL support – language acquisition

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Assessments, observations, and discussions with pupils indicate

under developed oral language skills and vocabulary gaps among many disadvantaged pupils on entry into the EYFS.

2

Our attendance data over the last 4 years indicates that attendance among disadvantaged pupils has been between 3 – 6% lower than for non-disadvantaged pupils.

23 – 34% of disadvantaged pupils have been ‘persistently absent’ compared to 1 – 12% of their peers during that period. Our assessments and observations indicate that absenteeism is negatively impacting disadvantaged pupils’ progress.

3

Support for families to access school trips, after school activities etc to ensure all children received equality of access.

4

Internal and external (where available) assessments indicate that maths and English attainment among disadvantaged pupils is, for some cohorts,  significantly below that of non-disadvantaged pupils.

 

5

Lack of engagement with the homework and learning beyond the school day

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Children in the early years to catch up with their peers in relation to attainment in Communication and Language.

By the end of the EYFS,  more PP children will reach age appropriate levels in Communication and Language.

The gap in attendance between PP pupils and non PP pupils will have reduced.

Less PP pupils will be on the persistent absenteeism list

More PP pupils will reach the national expected level for attendance

All children will have the same opportunity to experience a wide range of extra-curricular activities

PP children will attend after school and before school activities

A wider range of trips will be offered to all pupils

All children will receive high quality teaching and learning through quality first teach and targeted interventions

Lessen the GAP in attainment between PP and non PP pupils across maths and English

All children to have support and the opportunity to complete extra-curricular work (including academic interventions) .

PP children to be supported within school. Access to chrome books and PCs etc. to support this

 

 

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £67,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Smaller Classes in EYFS, KS1 and UKS2

EEF Toolkit-  International research evidence suggests that reducing class size can have positive impacts on pupil outcomes when implemented with socioeconomically disadvantaged pupil populations. Some studies also have also found that smaller class sizes in primary schools can have a greater positive impact on disadvantaged pupils than their peers.

4

All staff to be trained in the principles of Rosenshine’s theory and implement them in their practice

Rosenshine’s principle emphasizes the importance of giving students sufficient time to practise retrieval, ask questions, and get the desired help.

Cognitive Psychology Research reveals that the instructors who utilised the most effective teaching strategies had more students with higher educational success rates

4

RWInc training for all staff to update knowledge and understanding of phonics

Read Write Inc (RWInc) is a DfE validated Systematic Synthetic Phonics programme

Phonics approaches have a strong evidence base that indicates a positive impact on the accuracy of word reading (though not necessarily comprehension), particularly for disadvantaged pupils:

Phonics | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

EEF trials have shown how, when properly

trained and supported, teaching assistants

working in structured ways with small groups

can boost pupils’ progress.

4

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £18,353

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

EYFS staff deliver Talk Boost and Nelli

 

Staff in KS1 and KS2 will focus on vocabulary development across all subjects

 

Staff in KS1 and KS2 will focus on speaking and listening skills and vocabulary development for EAL pupils

There is a strong evidence base that suggests oral language interventions, including dialogic activities such as high-quality classroom discussion, are inexpensive to implement with high impacts on reading:

Oral language interventions | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

EEF 2020 Children receiving the NELI programme made the equivalent of +3 additional months progress in oral language skills and additional progress in early word reading

EEF Toolkit – Small group tuition has an average impact of four months’ additional progress over the course of a year.

EEF trials have shown how, when properly

trained and supported, teaching assistants

working in structured ways with small groups

can boost pupils’ progress.

1

Reading and phonics  interventions across school targeted at PP pupils

 

EEF Toolkit – On average, oral language approaches have a high impact on pupil outcomes of 6 months’ additional progress. These have a positive impact on reading progress.

EEF Toolkit – Small group tuition has an average impact of four months’ additional progress over the course of a year.

EEF Toolkit  – Reading comprehension strategies are high impact on average (+6 months). Alongside phonics it is a crucial component of early reading instruction.

Read Write Inc (RWInc) is a DfE validated Systematic Synthetic Phonics programme

Phonics approaches have a strong evidence base that indicates a positive impact on the accuracy of word reading (though not necessarily comprehension), particularly for disadvantaged pupils:

Phonics | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

4, 5

Maths interventions delivered across school

 

Mastery in Number training for EYFS and KS1 staff

EEF Toolkit – Small group tuition has an average impact of four months’ additional progress over the course of a year. Small group tuition is most likely to be effective if it is targeted at pupils’ specific needs. Diagnostic assessment can be used to assess the best way to target support.

4, 5

 

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £26,893

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Attendance –  Sharing a part-time home school liaison officer with a local school to support families with attendance and acute needs via TAF and CAF

DfE report on attendance (Working together to improve School attendance May 2022)  and attainment showed strong link between attendance and attainment. Pupils with 100% attendance 4.7 times more likely to achieve than those with 85%.

2

Employ a part time Sports Coach to provide after school and lunchtime sports clubs so that all pupils can attend.

Feedback from school pupil questionnaires in 2021 and 2022 indicated that some pupils could not attend after school clubs because of distance from school / no access to a car.

EEF Toolkit – The average impact of the engaging in physical activity interventions and approaches is about an additional one month’s progress over the course of a year. Participating in sports and physical activity is likely to have wider health and social benefits.

3

Support accessing trips, after school activities etc to ensure all pupils receive equal access

Ofsted 2013 report  – The full range of educational experiences – support is given to ensure that all pupils have full access to broad educational experiences, such as residential courses, competing in sporting events, subsidised music lessons, subsidised uniform,

Due to Covid restrictions, our pupils have had limited experiences outside the home. Evidence shows that these are vital areas of expenditure for children as it raises aspirations, improves cultural capital, improves children’s knowledge of the wider world and has a significant impact on pupils’ academic understanding. 

3

Contingency fund for acute issues.

Based on our experiences and those of similar schools to ours, we have identified a need to set a small amount of funding aside to respond quickly to needs that have not yet been identified.

All

 

Total budgeted cost: £ [insert sum of 3 amounts stated above] £112,246

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2021 to 2022 academic year.

Analysis of assessment data for the end of the academic year 2022, shows that by the end of EYFS 90 % of PP pupils achieved ARE in Communication and Language and 95 % in PSED ,50% of PP pupils passed the Y1 Phonics screen , 33% of PP pupils achieved ARE in reading and maths at the end of KS1 and 11% in writing . 78% of PP pupils achieved ARE in reading and maths at the end of KS2 and 89 % in writing. Although gaps still remain between the attainment of PP pupils in the earlier stages of school, due to the targeted interventions and quality first teaching, PP pupils are achieving in line with their peers by the end of their time in school. We will continue with many aspects of our strategy this academic year.

Although overall attendance in 2021/22 was lower than in the preceding 4 years at 93.2%, it was higher than the national average. Absence among disadvantaged pupils was 3% higher than their peers and persistent absence 22% higher. These gaps are larger than in previous years, which is why attendance is a focus of our current plan.    

Our assessments and observations indicated that pupil behaviour, wellbeing and mental health were significantly impacted last year, primarily due to COVID-19-related issues. The impact was particularly acute for disadvantaged pupils. We used pupil premium funding to provide wellbeing support for all pupils, and targeted interventions where required via RISE and other providers.

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme

Provider

Reading Plus

Reading Solutions

NELLI

Elklan

Conquer Maths

Conquer Maths

Times Table Rockstars

Maths Circle